Lecture - Weds 4th Oct - Dr Sophie Murray, Trinity College, Dublin - "Cloudy with a Chance of Flares: the importance of Space Weather Forecasting"

Dr Sophie Murray

Our speaker at this meeting is Dr Sophie Murray, currently a Research Fellow at TCD where she works on Space Weather projects within the Astrophysics Research Group. She has previously worked with the Met Office on Solar Physics and Thermospheric Modelling projects.

Dr Murray has over ten years experience as a research scientist, analysing and visualising large volumes of satellite data, and developing and verifying modelling techniques. Her current research interests range from solar flares and active regions to the impact of space weather on the Earth's upper atmosphere.

Lecture - Weds 20th Sept - Prof Mark Bailey, Emeritus Director of Armagh Observatory. "Ancient Stones and Comets: Developing the Giant-Comet Hypothesis"

Prof Mark Bailey
A bright comet can become the most prominent object in the sky other than the Sun and Moon and a source of wonderment and awe for those lucky enough to see one. This talk begins with an introduction to comets, their origin and proximate source in the Oort cloud; and then discusses evidence for exceptionally large, so-called "giant" comets with diameters 50km to 100km or more.  
 

IAA Members' Eclipse Success

Diamond Ring Eclipse

We're very pleased to report that a number of IAA members on holiday in the USA have had excellent viewing conditions for the Total Solar Eclipse - the featured image comes from Andy McCrea in Idaho with excellent conditions also being reported from Terry Moseley and Kate Russo in Wyoming and a number of members of the Irish Astronomical Community in Oregon.

Congratulations all, well done!

More to follow.

IAA Perseid Meteor Shower Barbeque - Sat 12th August - Delamont Country Park

Perseid Meteor

The Perseid Meteor shower is caused by the Earth passing through the debris trail of Comet 109P Swift-Tuttle which orbits the Sun with a 130 year period. The meteors hit the Earth's atmosphere comparitively fast, aprroximately 35 miles/sec or 120,000 mph and burn up at a height of around 50 miles. 

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