IAA public lecture: 1st April 7.30 p.m.- Kate Russo, Andy McCrea and IAA Members: "The Great Solar Eclipse of 20th March"

Partial Solar Eclipse
Since Kate Russo and Terry Moseley were beaten by clouds in the Faroes, there will be a slight change in presentation compared with the planned format.- Kate will give an account of our experience in the Faroes, and Dr Andy McCrea who was lucky enough to get a last minute cancellation for a seat on a high altitude jet flight to see it, will give his account & show his amazing photos.
 
There will be short presentations by other IAA members who led or helped at our local events, all of which had at least some success, and some were really good!

Solar Eclipse 20th March 2015 - Observing Events

Partial Solar Eclipse - Paul Evans 2009

 

 

On the morning of 20th March 2015 the North Atlantic Ocean will experience a Solar Eclipse. Along a narrow path through the ocean, making landfall in only two places, The Faroe Islands and Svalbard, the eclipse will be Total. Throughout the UK and Ireland there will be a Deep Partial Eclipse of the Sun peaking at around 09:30. At this time approximately 93.1% of the Sun will be obscured in Belfast, and a little more, 94.4%, will be obscured on the North Coast.

 

Lecture: 18th March 7:30pm QUB - Paul Evans - "The Deep Partial Solar Eclipse of 20th March 2015"

Paul Evans with the Saturn V rocket

Past President of the IAA Paul Evans is a veteran of three Total Solar Eclipses, a failed observation of an Annular Eclipse and has observed a good number of Partial Eclipses including a 97% one. Here he'll explain how it all works, what we'll be seeing and how to go about seeing as much as possible as safely as possible!

 

The lecture is free and open to all, including free refreshments. Venue: Bell Lecture Theatre, Physics Building, Queen's University, Belfast, at 7.30 p.m. 

Lecture: 4th March - Dr John Mason - "Mysteries of the Aurora"

Dr John Mason at the IAA
Dr John Mason is a former President of the British Astronomical Association, and a full member of the International Astronomical Union. He has given us many lectures over the years, all of them superb! He knows ‘everything about everything’ in astronomy.
 
 
Next to a Total Solar Eclipse, a good aurora is probably the most spectacular sight in the sky. They have been recorded since antiquity, and they are only about 50 miles above out heads, yet there’s a lot we don’t know about them. 
 

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