Category Archives: Uncategorized

Lecture, Wednesday 9th October, 7.30 p.m. “Measuring the brightness of stars from space: flares, outbursts, exoplanets and the inside of stars.” by Dr Gavin Ramsay (AOP)

Abstract:

The talk will outline how astronomers can answer important questions by carefully measuring the brightness of stars and how amateur astronomers have played an important part. It will also highlight the benefits of making such observations from space and will chart the capabilities and science which have come from satellites such as MOST, Corot, Kepler and TESS and look forward to the future Plato mission.

Gavin has lectured to us before, and explains things in a clear an simple way, so everyone should be able to enjoy this talk.

Doors open about 7.15pm. There is free parking available on the campus in the evenings. Admission Free, including light refreshments. We are located in the Bell Theatre, Department of Mathematics and Physics, QUB – details here……

 
With thanks to the Astrophysics Research Centre, QUB, for assistance with this event.
 

Bell Lecture Theatre, Physics Building , QUB, 7.30pm

All welcome. Free admission, including light refreshments.

IAA Public Lecture, 25th September. Dr Mike Simms (UM): “1969; a special year for space rocks (and not just from the Moon)”

Mike is one of Ireland's leading meteorite experts, and has given us many fascinating lectures before. This one focuses on 3 very significant meteorite falls which, coincidentally, occurred in the same year as the first retrieved rocks from the Moon. One of those was the famous Bovedy Meteorite, that last one known to fall in N. Ireland. A fascinating talk is to be expected, delivered in Mike's inimitable style. 

 

Summary of Mike's talk:

 
1969 was an auspicious time for rocks from Space. Meteorite falls at Bovedy in Northern Ireland, Allende in Mexico, and Murchison in Australia, all led to breakthroughs in our understanding of the early Solar System. Rocks brought back by Apollos 11 and 12 gave us our first chance to find out if the Moon really was made of cheese. And a chance discovery down in Antarctica was to have a fundamental influence on the future of meteoritics for decades to come.

 

Doors open about 7.15pm. There is free parking available on the campus in the evenings. Admission Free, including light refreshments. We are located in the Bell Theatre, Department of Mathematics and Physics, QUB – details here……

 
With thanks to the Astrophysics Research Centre, QUB, for assistance with this event.
 

Bell Lecture Theatre, Physics Building , QUB, 7.30pm

All welcome. Free admission, including light refreshments.

IAA Apollo Celebrations

There is huge interest in the 50th Anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission in July 1969 and to this effect the IAA has two exhibitions running featuring memorabilia from the time as well as a talk on the subject by IAA Past president and IFAS Chair Paul Evans.

One exhibition runs over the weekend 6th and 7th July at Portballintrae Village Hall This is open from 10:30 – 16:00 on both days and there will be a talk “Navigation Through the Ages” in the main hall at 15:00 on the Sunday by IAA President Brian Beesley

The other exhibition is currently open and runs until 31st July in the Bangor Carnegie Library

On 18th July at 15:00 Paul Evans will give a talk on the subject “Apollo 11: To the Moon and back half a century ago”. This covers the story, starting in 1944, of why and how they went to the Moon.

NLC Season now in full swing

An excellent display of Noctilucent Clouds was visible from Northern Ireland in the early hours of Tuesday 18th June. As befits the Solar Minimum, this iwas a very high and bright display and an encouraging sign for a good season. This generally runs from the beginning of June until early August. There is some belief that the emission of Greenhouse Gases into the atmosphere is amplifying the displays, paradoically by making the mesosphere colder as less infrared is radiated upwards having been absorbed by Greenhouse Gases.

Keep an eye out to the Northern sky anytime after Sunset and before Sunrise. As the sky darkens theses amazing clouds will make themselves know,

Image Credit: Andy McCrea, Bangor 18th June 2019