Category Archives: Event

IAA Zoom Lecture Weds 31st March – Brian harvey

China: Moon, Mars and Space Station

Synopsis:

This presentation tells the story of China’s space programme from 1956 and how it became a space superpower this century. China has astonished the world by landing a rover on the far side of the moon. Its probe Tianwen is now orbiting and preparing to land on Mars and China’s space station, Tianhe, will be launched next month. The presentation looks at the past, present and future of China in space and its ambitions for human and solar system exploration.

Bio:

Brian Harvey is a writer and broadcaster on spaceflight. His first book was Race into space – the Soviet space programme. His books and book chapters have been translated into Russian, Chinese and Korean. He wrote China in space – the great leap (2nd, edition, Springer-Paxis, 2019), now in publication in Chinese. In the course of the research, he met China’s first space man, Yang Liwei and first space woman, Liu Yang. His next project, due for publication this summer, is European-Russian cooperation in space – from de Gaulle to ExoMars.

Paul Evans is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Topic: Brian Harvey
Time: Mar 31, 2021 07:15 PM London

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86243362542?pwd=NW1PbjdLb3B1Qm4vSnBtTldBNmJ2Zz09

Meeting ID: 862 4336 2542
Passcode: 391881

The room will open around 19:15 to allow for a prompt start

This talk will also be Simulcast on our YouTube Channel

https://www.youtube.com/user/irishastronomy/videos

IAA Zoom Lecture -Weds 17th March – John Flannery

“Charles Messier: His Life and his Legacy”

Synopsis:

Two hundred and fifty years ago this year the French astronomer Charles Messier (1730-1817) submitted the first draft of a catalogue that would guarantee him lasting fame. Now recognised as a list of the sky’s showpiece objects, it contains highlights such as the Great Nebula in Orion (designated M42); the Andromeda Galaxy (M31); and the beautiful Pleiades star cluster (M45).

Tonight’s talk by Irish Astronomical Society member John Flannery will tell a little about the life of Charles Messier, how his catalogue came into being, and its importance in astronomy.

Bio:

John is editor of the IAS quarterly journal and is active in astronomy outreach. His main interests as an amateur astronomer are the sky lore of world cultures; binocular observing; and astronomical history.

Paul Evans is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Topic: John Flannery
Time: Mar 17, 2021 07:15 PM London

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83793251894?pwd=NWJwREVucEhnTjBYM3c4RXNZOGVjUT09

Meeting ID: 837 9325 1894
Passcode: 960033

The room will open around 19:15 to allow for a prompt start

This talk will also be Simulcast on our YouTube Channel

https://www.youtube.com/user/irishastronomy/videos

IAA Zoom Lecture Weds 3rd March 7:30pm – Kevin Nolan

Title: Mars, the Search for Origins.


Abstract:

Mars shared an early history not dissimilar to Earth, and so the origin of life there is considered plausible. This talk looks at the history of our engagement with Mars; and examines the present day multi-decadal robotic exploration campaign to characterise the planet and what it has to reveal about life origins processes.

The reasoning for exploring the planet are considered, and the resulting scientific priorities, mission and instrument characteristics outlined. Finally, key results to date are presented, what they reveal about the planet and how they will shape the next missions there.

 

Biography:

Kevin Nolan is a lecturer in physics at TU Dublin, Tallaght campus. Having returned to academia from industry, Kevin is also working on a part-time PhD under Dr. Niall Smith, Head of Research at CIT. The project originally involved developing a software pipeline for the ESA Integral / OMC camera in association with Prof. Lorraine Hanlon, UCD; and now involves the data analysis of AGN photometric data derived from the mission.

Kevin is also involved in science outreach and has been a Volunteer for The Planetary Society (founder Carl Sagan) since 1998. In 2008 Kevin had a popular science book published titled “Mars, a Cosmic Stepping Stone” examining the motivations for the robotic exploration of the planet Mars. Kevin also makes frequent contributions to Astronomy Ireland magazine, The Irish Times and RTE in the areas of space science and exploration. 

Paul Evans is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Topic: Dr Kevin Nolan
Time: Mar 3, 2021 07:15 PM London

Join Zoom Meeting
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Meeting ID: 850 7503 1888
Passcode: 771101

The room will open around 19:15 to allow for a prompt start

This talk will also be Simulcast on our YouTube Channel

https://www.youtube.com/user/irishastronomy/videos

IAA Zoom Lecture Weds 17th Feb 19:30 – Dr Ernst De Mooij (QUB)

Title: Investigating the atmospheres of alien worlds


Abstract:

It has now been over 25 years since the discovery of the first exoplanet around a Sun-like star. Since then, thousands of exoplanets have been discovered, most in systems that do not resemble our own Solar System. What is more, we have been able to study the atmospheres of some of these worlds.

In this talk, I will discuss how we can study exoplanet atmospheres and what we have learned so far. 

Biography:

Dr. Ernst de Mooij is a lecturer at Queen’s University Belfast. He obtained his PhD from Leiden University, after which he became a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Toronto. Subsequently he moved to Queen’s University Belfast as the Michael West Fellow, following on from that he was an assistant professor for 3 years at Dublin City University.

His research is focused on the characterisation of exoplanets and their environment, including their atmospheres and exo-rings.

Paul Evans is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Topic: Dr Ernst de Mooij
Time: Feb 17, 2021 07:15 PM London

Join Zoom Meeting
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Meeting ID: 862 0368 2703
Passcode: 090170

The room will open around 19:15 to allow for a prompt start

This talk will also be Simulcast on our YouTube Channel

https://www.youtube.com/user/irishastronomy/videos

IAA Zoom Lecture Wed 3rd February 19:30 – Pete Williamson FRAS

 “Remote telescopes for Public and Educational Access”

Synopsis. 

This talk will cover what is available in access to remote observatories, and how you c an get involved with the educational networks. There is also a section on the growing amount of RAW data coming in from space missions that we ourselves can manipulate and process.

This resource is of particular interest and value during the current lockdown.

Biography.

Pete is a very well known astronomer, broadcaster, lecturer and astronomy outreach enthusiast, perhaps best known for his amazing photos using remote telescopes from all around the world, including the 2-meter Faulks telescopes, as well as his own near the Welsh border. You can check him out at www.peterwilliamson.co.uk

Paul Evans is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Topic: Pete Williamson FRAS
Time: Feb 3, 2021 07:15 PM London

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87652213797?pwd=YTRyaWR6UWlKMGZjUmR3MU9Uemovdz09

Meeting ID: 876 5221 3797
Passcode: 750496

The room will open around 19:15 to allow for a prompt start

This talk will also be Simulcast on our YouTube Channel

https://www.youtube.com/user/irishastronomy/videos

IAA Zoom Lecture 20th Jan 19:30 – Prof Lorraine Hanlon (UCD)

‘Gamma-ray bursts and the gravitational wave connection’

LORRAINE HANLON is Full Professor of Astronomy at University College Dublin (UCD) and is Director of C-Space, UCD’s Centre for Space Research.

She did her undergraduate (BSc) and graduate (MSc and PhD) degrees in Experimental Physics and was a research fellow and an EU Human Capital and Mobility fellow at the European Space and Technology Research Centre (ESTEC) in the Netherlands, ESA’s establishment for space mission development. 

 She joined the academic staff of UCD in 1996, serving as Head of the School of Physics between 2008 and 2011. She is currently Chair of ESA’s Astronomy Working Group and of the INTEGRAL Users’ Group, is a member of the THESEUS Science Study Team, the Space Science Advisory Committee and a member of Council of the Royal Astronomical Society. 

Lorraine is programme director of UCD’s MSc in Space Science and Technology. Her main research interests are gamma-ray bursts, multi-messenger astronomy, robotic telescopes, and space instrumentation. She is the Endorsing Professor for EIRSAT-1, Ireland’s first satellite, a CubeSat being developed by an interdisciplinary team of UCD students and staff under ESA’s ‘Fly Your Satellite!’ programme.  

Paul Evans is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Topic: Prof Lorraine Hanlon
Time: Jan 20, 2021 07:15 PM London

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89489778385?pwd=eU1qY3prb3VVazFSOG4xZlVQQTUvZz09

Meeting ID: 894 8977 8385
Passcode: 537631

The room will open around 19:15 to allow for a prompt start

This talk will also be Simulcast on our YouTube Channel

https://www.youtube.com/user/irishastronomy/videos

IAA Zoom Lecture 6th Jan 2021 19:30 – Prof Stephen Smartt (QUB)

“Searching for Kilonovae in the nearby Universe” 

The LIGO-Virgo gravitational wave detectors carried out the their third observing run (called O3) during 2019-2020. Many black hole mergers were detected, along with one confident binary neutron star merger and a possible black hole – neutron star system. At the same time, wide-field optical sky surveys are discovering a remarkable diversity in how stars merge, collapse and explode. Only one gravitational wave source has had a discovery of an electromagnetic counterpart.

In 2017 a a pair of merging neutron stars produced what we now call a kilonova (“a thousand novas”!). This was a remarkably fast transient, which decayed in a matter of days.  Many surveys have been searching for these kilonovae without success but given they can be as bright as supernovae they should be detectable irrespective of gravitational wave signals. I will discuss our efforts to uncover this new class of object and reasons why we haven’t found them yet. 

Stephen Smartt is a professor of astrophysics at Queen’s University. He has worked at the Isaac Newton Group of telescopes on La Palma and the University of Cambridge. He leads several international projects, mostly focused on regularly surveying the sky to find anything that changes and his group manage the large scale data processing of two NASA funded surveys. He has discovered supernova progenitors, the faintest supernovae and most luminous explosions as well as mergers of compact stars. In 2018 he was awarded the Royal Irish Academy’s Gold Medal and was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 2020.

Paul Evans is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Topic: IAA Prof Stephen Smartt
Time: Jan 6, 2021 07:15 PM London

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83574479742?pwd=WDZhZm5kUFVGeXg0ZCt2a3Y4Skp5UT09

Meeting ID: 835 7447 9742
Passcode: 322946

This talk will also be Simulcast on our YouTube Channel

https://www.youtube.com/user/irishastronomy/videos

IAA ZOOM LECTURE – WEDS 16th DEC 19:30 – Dr Gavin Ramsay – “Gravitational Wave Optical Transient Observer”

Abstract:
The direct detection of gravitational waves from merging black holes and neutron stars using the Ligoand Virgo detectors is one of humankind’s greatest triumphs. However, the exact position in the skyof these bursts is not well constrained, often to within hundreds or more square degrees.

For merging neutrons stars, it was predicted that an electromagnetic counterpart would be visible. If this could be identified then so would the location of the merging event. The Gravitational-wave Optical Transient Observer (GOTO) is a project whose goal is to detect these optical counterparts of gravitational wave events. One prototype has been running on the island of La Palma for more than 2 years, but next year will see a second array on La Palma, with two more nodes in Siding Spring being planned. 


Bio:
Gavin did his PhD at UCL’s Mullard Space Science Laboratory using data from the Rosat X-ray satellite to study magnetic accreting binaries. After several years at the University of Utrecht, he returned to MSSL, and came to Armagh in 2007.

He still studies accreting binaries, but has led several wide field photometric surveys and also uses Kepler and TESS data to study the activity levels of Solar type and low mass stars. He leads Armaghs contribution to the GOTO project.

Paul Evans is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Topic: IAA – Dr Gavin Ramsay
Time: Dec 16, 2020 07:15 PM London

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/88696378331?pwd=Z2JDN2k0eE9mUmVia2Y5ampnem5pQT09

Meeting ID: 886 9637 8331
Passcode: 180521

The room will open at approximately 19:15 to get everyone in for a 19:30 sharp start.

The meeting will also be simulcast on our YouTube Channel

https://www.youtube.com/user/irishastronomy/videos

IAA Zoom Lecture – Weds 2nd Dec 19:30 – Dr Caitriona Jackman, DIAS

“Adventures in the Outer Solar System”

Abstract:
In this talk we will Zoom (pun intended) to the outer solar system to
explore the gas giant planets Jupiter and Saturn. I will furnish the
audience with plenty of fun facts about the amazing worlds of dynamic
auroral displays, diverse moons, and mysterious atmospheres. I will
focus on some of the famous spacecraft including Cassini which spent 13
years exploring the Saturn system, and NASA’s Juno which is currently in
orbit around Jupiter.

Bio:
Dr. Caitriona Jackman is an Honorary Professor at the Dublin Institute
for Advanced Studies where she leads a research group on Planetary
Magnetospheres. She has worked with data from missions including NASA’s Cassini at Saturn, ESA’s Cluster mission in orbit around Earth, NASA’s Juno at Jupiter, and with data from the Hubble Space Telescope, and the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Her research interests include understanding how the aurora works, and how machine learning and complexity science can be used to study huge volumes of data from space.

Paul Evans is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Topic: IAA – Prof Caitriona Jackman
Time: Dec 2, 2020 07:15 PM London

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89704234875?pwd=VXpDMFI2N2JneG9RTW9MLzJ1bjM4dz09

Meeting ID: 897 0423 4875
Passcode: 551722

The room will open at approximately 19:15 to get everyone in for a 19:30 sharp start.

The meeting will also be simulcast on our YouTube Channel

https://www.youtube.com/user/irishastronomy/videos

IAA Zoom Lecture – Weds 18th Nov 19:30 – Dr Jorick Vink

“Thirty Years of Hubble: opening the Treasure Chest”

Synopsis:

Over the last 30 years the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has spoilt us with the most beautiful, colourful images one can image. In addition to this inspirational role these observations have provided key insights into a vast number of astronomical research fields varying from the formation of planetary systems to Cosmology.

In this talk I attempt to give an overview of some of the most ground-breaking Astrophysical insights that HST has given the world of Astrophysics, revealing the stories behind those pretty pictures. 

Bio:

Jorick Vink started his career at Utrecht University in the Netherlands while also spending an 8 month period at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Centre.After his PhD, he moved to Imperial College London, before eventually settling at Armagh Observatory in 2007, where he was also Acting Director at the Planetarium during the merger of the two organisations in 2015/16.

He obtained a Visiting Professorship from the University of Leeds in 2017, and is currently President of the IAU Commission of massive stars, and Principle Investigator (PI) of a Large Programme with ESO-VLT complementing the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) ULLYSES Project of massive stars.

Paul Evans is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Topic: IAA – Dr Jorick Vink
Time: Nov 18, 2020 07:15 PM London

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86833296763?pwd=a0lmdnhtYlBJTDV4Q0VNVWRPanJZQT09

Meeting ID: 868 3329 6763
Passcode: 439102

The room will open at approximately 19:15 to get everyone in for a 19:30 sharp start.

The meeting will also be simulcast on our YouTube Channel

https://www.youtube.com/user/irishastronomy/videos